Webinar Q&A:
Why the Elements of Reasoning are Essential in Everyday Life
Dr. Gerald Nosich, Senior Fellow

March 4th, 2021
8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (5:00 p.m. Pacific)
Duration: 60 Minutes
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Passcode: 502982

Our thinking largely determines the quality of our work, learning, and life. Those who have not yet internalized the foundations of critical thinking may view them merely as tools to be wielded on specific occasions, and then to be put away for days, weeks, or even months at a time. For example, such persons may analyze and evaluate their reasoning when making large purchases (cars, houses, etc.), but may otherwise leave their daily decision-making at the mercy of the spontaneous, associational thinking that comes more naturally to human beings.

Those who have made a greater commitment to intellectual discipline are aware that examining their reasoning throughout their waking hours, during the many hundreds or thousands of choices they make in their daily lives, can pay great dividends that accumulate over time.

In this session, Dr. Gerald Nosich will answer your questions about how the Elements of Reasoning – the building blocks of human thought – can be practically integrated into our thinking in everyday life.

Remember: This session depends on your questions, and Dr. Nosich will presuppose that you are reasonably familiar with the Elements of Reasoning in the Paul-Elder Framework for Critical Thinking. Even if you have learned about the elements in our written work, our online courses, or at our events, we strongly recommend you complete the following activities to prepare for this Q&A session:
  1. Read the article, “The Elements of Reasoning and the Intellectual Standards.”
  2. Watch the video, “The Elements of Reasoning by Dr. Linda Elder, Part 1 of 2.”
  3. Watch the video, “The Elements of Reasoning by Dr. Linda Elder, Part 2 of 2.”
  4. Read pages 5, 7, 22, and 23 in The Thinker’s Guide to Analytic Thinking.
  5. After reading the text at the top of the page, complete the activity “Analyze the Logic of a Problem of Issue” using a real problem from your life.
  6. After reading the text at the top of the page, complete the activity “Analyze the Logic of a Concept or Idea.” Focus on a real idea that you use in your daily life – for example, the idea that “I should put my children’s needs before my own,” or that “I should ensure my needs are met before trying to help others.”
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